Jump to content
jrgordonsenior

What Can NASA Do With Out-Of-Control Racers?....

Recommended Posts

ryan0

Again, this all comes down to basic driving awareness, not even talent. .

 

yellow or not... was that black GT3 going to make the corner?.. thats a lot of speed he tried squeezing by with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
echtm3

Again, this all comes down to basic driving awareness, not even talent. .

 

yellow or not... was that black GT3 going to make the corner?.. thats a lot of speed he tried squeezing by with.

 

Agreed, he put himself in a very difficult position, not something I would have done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior
I'm not sure we have a good solution to this, but we need to at least people do the basics: watch the flags, KNOW WHAT THEY MEAN, fill out incident reports, and don't try to win the race in the first few laps.

 

HTH

 

John I saw the starter's yellow and green flags which is conflicting. I understand NASA's intent was to start the clock and stay on schedule, but track safety has to take precedence always. The starter should have been vigorously waving double yellow flags with the green behind them if necessary. My earlier point was that there wasn't any other flags at the subsequent 3 stations the racer's passed before seeing the double yellow at T9. Racers know the track's green if the next station isn't waving a yellow and I believe this contributed to the incidents in T5/6 and T9. This is not intended as an excuse for poor driving choices....

 

As for first lap incidents, I think the pole sitter needs to pick up the pace from the beginning of the straight to stratch out the filed. This would alleviate the crowding at the first turn after the start.

 

JR Gordon

 

Ready ... Aim... (Just kidding) - Actually I think this thread is very educational.

 

First, Flags confusing? WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT? How is a green with a yellow confusion? They are two different flags that don't overlap in the slightest! I was in the grandstands on the radio with car 475, and saw the yellow before the green was thrown, and said "You're green but don't pass until you go by the incident", and ALL BUT ONE DRIVER did that! You can see clearly in the video that SRLANG (Scott Lang) knew the situation, dropped in behind the others and waited until he passed (listen to the throttle).

 

The reason there were no flags until t9, is that control had no idea how bad the incident in T2 was until those cars reached T9. But, as many drivers in Sunday's meeting said, how could you go by that corvette in T2 and not know there was going to be a dbl-yellow? It should be obvious, and if you watch the behavior of the lead cars (Micky, Vic, Scott) they are all ready and see the dbl-yellow in T9, when Vali comes flying over the hairpin

 

Again, this all comes down to basic driving awareness, not even talent. When you see a flag, you need to figure out what they (control) are refering to, and not just blindly go to the next corner. This doesn't just make you safer, but also faster, since the ones on the start who saw the flag and then the incident could be on the gas sooner before the flagger in t3, although all is moot since the incident was so bad.

 

As far as your last sentence, I think the pole sitter saw the flags, realized what was going on and didn't want to be 100% until he/she knew what the problem was. As far as crowding on turn 3, welcome to CSW .

 

 

John I think we're on the same page here, perhaps just some differences in semantics. Scott, Sergio above, and mayself have never seen a combined yellow/green flag before though it's obvious the intent. My point was the starter should have been leaning out of the box and seriously waving DOUBLE YELLOW flags with the green behind it. Yes only 1 car took off at the start, but he took others with him as they had yet to see the Corvette in T2.

 

How "Control" could control have no idea how bad the incident in T2 was until the cars in the second race group reached T9 in beyond my comprehension. How could anyone miss the 2 cars spinning in oil trying to avoid the Corvette in the first group? The second group thankfully made it thru the oil without incident, but upon NOT seeing any flags at T3 they all took off racing. Yes they probably knew it was going full course yellow momentarily, which is why they wanted to gain any position possible in case it stayed yellow for the entire race. Again, there should have been double yellows from the starter thru every station on course within seconds of that Corvette oiling the banking and the 2 cars spinning. That was a pretty obvious hint that the track wasn't safe in T2, the most hazzardous turn on that track.

 

My comment rearding the pole sitter picking up the pace referred to any race not CS specifically....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ryan F.

This is great to see this kind of discussion. I welcome anyone who thinks they can help us improve the enjoyment of the racers to join the NASA team and lend a hand. I have been making this request for years and not a single person making suggestions (complaints) has ever actually helped with anything. Furthermore, racers that have been required to help in a certain roles always walk away with a totally different understanding of the situation. In short, you really can't fully understand until you have experienced it first hand so please join us of you feel you could be a helpful resource. Heck, send us a person with your vision if you can't personally show up.

 

I see some words such as "beyond my comprehension", "obvious", "clearly", etc. All those point to very strong feelings of assuredness when the results of the situation point directly to the opposite. If it was so simple we wouldn't be discussing this right?

 

The reality is that many of the drivers pay attention, and know what to do and handle the situation well. Others may not have paid attention, or worse not known what to do. As a result you have a few misguided drivers that cause issues. When contact happens someone is more at fault than the other. There are very easy ways to avoid contact yet it happens on a regular basis. Each situation is dealt with on an individual basis and reprimands happen. Parties that are not involed are not privy to know the outcome yet it seems some people feel as if nothing happens. For this season, I have sent 2 drivers home for avoidable contact. Many more have been put on multiple race probation. The point is don't assume that nothing happens to people that make a gross error. Nonetheless, when people don't turn in forms there isn't anything we can do. If both parties want to hide then we have no ability to handle the situation properly. This is why we make it so clear that both parties need to take action.

 

I think Sergio is doing a great job and should feel empowered to keep the GTS group on the right path. It is a very tough job to manage an enthusiastic group of people with fast cars and a desire to win. Any series leader is more than welcome to help ease the load of the overall Race Director and keep the group on their toes with strict rules. Most groups that do see great success. That being said, people enjoy NASA because we want to encourage real racing (close battles) so we need to constantly work to find that perfect balance.

 

People may have seen or heard from events in the past were I had to take extreme action and impose harsh penalties for even dropping a wheel off track. The driving was way out of line and I had to do something. I hear that people don't appreciate our lectures so I am happy to impose harsher sanctions to keep people in line. The problem is that only 20% of drivers can perform very well with extremely tight performance factors. If we tossed everyone out that made avoidable mistakes then we wouldn't have many people at the track!!! Ask yourself how many times have you gone "off" in a years period of time and think about that action as a time that something very bad could have happened. There are some people I know who have posted in this threads that often run 5 events in a row and never take the car off track, while still setting fast times. Ask yourself if you can do that? If not that should be your goal. Bad things happen when people overestimate their abilities.

 

The end result is heads up driving is the key to success. Each driver really needs to focus on the surroundings and make good decisions. The problem we face is that goal a "philosophy" not something we can make happen in concrete fashion. Thus, it is only something we can talk about and hope to inspire our drivers.

 

The in car awareness box with different lights to indicate track condition is a FANTASTIC idea. In fact Jerry Kunzman had built a prototype 8 years ago and it is more complicated than it seems. As I have said before, if it is simple then "bring it to market and get it done". Produce it and sell it for reasonable amount and we will be happy to use it. Remember though, it needs to be within a realm everyone will desire to have for the cost!

 

Finally, we will be happy to broadcast over a common radio frequency and it is a GREAT TOOL if everyone takes advantage. I just ask for the "racer community" to provide one thing.... Get me a volunteer (means unpaid) for the weekend that will show up to every event and perform that function. It should be the same person for all weekends so we don't need to train a different person which will yield different results. I would love to see this happen.

 

Once that happens, just let me know where to broadcast. UHF, VHF or FRS. I can only do one. Be aware that racers have a mix of all 3 setups and most radios don't have the capability to scan 2 channels and use a primary for crew communication. The very expensive units can do it, but very few of the affordable units. To add some variables to the mix, only 30% of the drivers have radios. So when you expect someone to be on the same page, I can guarantee 70% won't have the radio alert. It is not practical to require people to use the radios at this level of racing so lets avoid that discussion. FWIW, we use an optional radio broadcast for the CMC group with some decent success. It is a internal program that the CMC group manages, and most drivers decide to get the right radio to listen to the alerts and they put a trained person in the control booth with us. Ultimately, the racers all need to decide if it is important enough to them to use standardized equipment so we can add this extra level of information. We require a common communications Frequency at the 25hr event but it becomes unrealistic to "require" it at the regional level with so many different desires, needs, and financial commitment.

 

Sorry for the long dissertation. I guess the real point is please join us to help make the experience better as that is my #1 goal. Keep the great ideas coming and I encourage you to take that vision and help me implement more ways to make racing more enjoyable and safer. Feel free to contact me via email or phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ryan0

Once that happens, just let me know where to broadcast. UHF, VHF or FRS.

 

 

Why not just give out your existing radio frequencies?

 

We don't need a special broadcast... all that information comes from race control/corner workers anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior

Ryan I waited 2-1/2 weeks after the event to start this thread and only because no one else commented on that weekend. I realize I'm stirring the pot a bit, but I think it's a valuable discussion. We all need to contribute to safer racing than what we've seen recently at BW and CS. That contribution includes the staff running the event and the person in charge of the race itself.

 

I don't think it's unreasonable to expect race control to react quickly to a dangerous situation on the track. Our safety depends on that. Yes I do find it incomprehensible that it took race control until the second group hit T9 that they called for full course yellow. From the time the Corvette blew in T2 until the second group made T9 was several minutes. I think it's fortunate there wasn't any other carnage. The oiling was significant, it took 2 crews 20 minutes to clean it up.

 

Absolutely heads-up driving is the key component to a safe, successful race. Enforcing the rules & regulations as Sergio has suggested will definitely contribute to making the track safer if only by getting rid of repeat offenders. Maybe NASA should consider having a short briefing early each morning to remind racers of their on-track responsibilities. I also believe having a race controller that's ready to call a race immediately if unsafe conditions materialize is equally important. Our safety and our cars depend on it.

 

I would be happy to help with race control at BW outside of the GTS races. Please feel free to contact me directly at: [email protected]

(310) 990-9449

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
echtm3
Yes I do find it incomprehensible that it took race control until the second group hit T9 that they called for full course yellow. From the time the Corvette blew in T2 until the second group made T9 was several minutes.

 

What?

 

It took control less than a minute to issue the full course caution. The first yellow was thrown at start (where the confusion for some started), and then a double was thrown by the time everyone got to T9 (see video). So I don't know where you get "several minutes".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior
Yes I do find it incomprehensible that it took race control until the second group hit T9 that they called for full course yellow. From the time the Corvette blew in T2 until the second group made T9 was several minutes.

 

What?

 

It took control less than a minute to issue the full course caution. The first yellow was thrown at start (where the confusion for some started), and then a double was thrown by the time everyone got to T9 (see video). So I don't know where you get "several minutes".

 

Less than a minute from when? Scott's tape is 1:43 and the incident had already occured when it started....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
echtm3
Less than a minute from when? Scott's tape is 1:43 and the incident had already occured when it started....

 

Well, sorry if I came of rude, again, I think this whole discussion is great.

 

I timed it from the start until turn 5 or so, so ~1min.

 

But the yellow for the incident went up before the green (we agree on that), but how was control to know how bad it was when there was another group starting. Given all the stuff going on, I think they did pretty darn good. Can it be improved, certainly, and I think we've made great progress because of this discussion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ryan F.

John,

 

As long as someone can go away from something more educated or if improvement can be made, then discussion is always useful.

 

Since you posed a statement which clearly infers that you feel my staff in race control made decisions that put your safety (even though you were not racing at Cal Speedway that weekend) at risk I must respond very directly. To help my understanding, I can only guess you are making these conclusions a spectator rather than behind the wheel? Please correct me if I am in error.

 

1) I hope you can be 100% honest with this question which is... "Have you read the NASA CCR in its entirety"? If your honest answer is no my reply (and people know me to be very direct) is that we should not even have this debate as you are not qualified to enter the debate. If you have, I applaud you I will reply as you deserve it.

 

Some random thoughts......

> My personal goal and my staffs mission is to always run the safest event possible. There is nothing we ever do to take risks, and our approach is very consistent. There isn't any more "contribution" we can make as safety is our #1 goal. If there is something at the track happens which does not reflect that it is not because we are relaxed, lazy, lack concern, or indifferent. We are just people responding to the situation as best as humanly possible.

 

> Our staff reacts as quickly as possible to any situation. Again, unless you have the experience of doing any of those jobs, you are making conclusions you are not qualified to make simply because you were not in their position. I will give you an example about principles we know and heed, such as throwing a red flag immediately can cause additional crashes if not done properly. This isn't something anybody would inherently know. I would like to point out a yellow flag was displayed BEFORE the disabled car on the bottom of the track and that conveys to the driver a "caution" zone and something is wrong. The incident is the problem area which was covered by a caution flag and our main focus. Having a double yellow has nothing to do with the situation about the disabled car. As John Matthew pointed out, people that were racing after the fact and crashing into each other is a DRIVER issue, nothing to do with the flags (although yellows were displayed and ignored in other areas as well). If you really know the CCR, a double yellow would actually allow people to go faster in some areas to catch the pace car. A single waiving yellow is the biggest indicator of a problem ahead and means to slow down.

 

> As an aside, you can't display double yellow immediately and start a race with a green unless you know a human with 3 hands. (3 flags to display) Thus, one must have realistic expectation on what is actually possible. Once the groups were started the entire track went FCY (full course yellow), including the start station.

 

> I hope you realize that we are a reactionary force. It is totally unrealistic to feel we can provide a safety bubble at every instant you are in the car. If you were to follow a car 3 feet off their bumper and they blow a tire or drop 5 quarts of oil, you have the potential for getting wrapped up in someone else's mess. We assess a situation and make the best decision we know to handle the situation but nothing is instantaneous. It is quite easy if you are a spectator to be watching "your favorite car" and something happens in that exact area (crash, off, engine blown, debris, etc) and start getting all exciting wondering why nothing is happening from race control. We have 10-15 communications calls happening simultaneously, 2+ miles of race track to get eyes on the scene, assess our resources, and implement a plan of action. It is very easy to pass judgement on something which you have never done. I always find it odd that it is easy for people to critique race management yet in any other business it is normal to get an expert in the field to render a educated assessment. I love examples so here is a good one that coveys my feeling...... Next airline flight when you experience some turbulence rush into the cockpit and tell them what they should be doing since you find it unacceptable that they can't find smooth air. The pilots are qualified to do the job and they are working to make it happen as best they can.

 

> As a general rule, I hate meetings. In fact, they are totally unnecessary if people really know what they are doing. However, you notice we have meetings every day so that says something else. Having meetings for warm up and qualifying where everyone's goal to go fast is to stay out of traffic would accomplish what? If I have to have a meeting a 7AM to remind everyone not to crash into each other then I really believe those racers should take up a different sport. NASA believes we need to treat people like adults and deal with the small % of problems. Also, note the comments from others how the dislike the race meetings where we point out specific problem areas. Imagine if we were like other groups and just had a free for all. In a perfect world we wouldn't have meetings. In fact, if people could stay on the track and not hit walls, or other cars we wouldn't have any meetings. Perhaps some day that will happen.

 

> The people that know me well will affirm that I take this very seriously (as does my staff). I am a racer myself and you will see requirements like H&N devices, center nets, and the strictest roll cage standards as rules buy choice. This is because I am a racer myself and I believe we should be as safe as possible. There are some groups that allow people to be in full competition with just a roll bar! Come on, that is just asking for trouble. I have the best response personnel and the best equipment. Dr. Greg Greenbaum is an ER doctor and has responded to every life threatening injury we have dealt with in SoCal. We have the best insurance in the industry that provides 1Million in participant medical coverage. The reason we can get this that is becuase of our safety standards. Ask other racing groups if they provide that.

 

The bottom line is I thrive on criticism and am very open to find any areas that can be improved. However, I have been doing this a very long time and feel we have a well tuned system. Other groups can't pull off what we can and that a reflection of philosophy, organizational skills, planning, and staff quality. Ask another group to grid cars by class, with 3 starts, some standing others flying. I respond in detail because I am very concerned you feel we might have been lacking in the most important area. Perhaps my reply gives some insight as to the nuances of the task at hand but in Oct I will welcome you to join us at BW and join us on the front lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
benny

having raced in many organization here in the US and in Europe, I firmly believe that NASA is doing a great job.

Reaction time are only as fast as human and communication allows.

My point of view: having race with 3 different US organization, plus racing in SPA in an FIA professional event (including GT and Touring cars), I feel much safer with NASA than the rest.

FYI at SPA during the 24hr race they will only go full course yellow once per hour. Yes, can you believe that, in an FIA event I got stuck in the kitty litter and waited 40 minutes for the track to go full course yellow, so I could be towed. Want to talk about safety ! (not mentioning the beer cans I saw at the corner station)

 

 

Yes improvement are always possible, and NASA does listen to the feedback. I was part of the process in a safety rule change, so I can tell you for a fact that the response to a well though and well research rule change is very favorable.

 

As far as “out of control racers” I’m not oppose to a point deduction system, but then again this will require more human resource for NASA (or maybe to the series director)

 

This is only my personal opinion.

 

P.S: Please ,we do not need more meetings !!! I know you must be a porsche guy that love those 3 time a day drivers meeting

 

benny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior
John,

 

As long as someone can go away from something more educated or if improvement can be made, then discussion is always useful.

 

I couldn't agree more....

 

Thanks everyone for their participation and opinions, that's why I started this thread albeit it 2-1/2 weeks after the event.

 

Benny just 1 meeting please....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ExRacer
I don't think it's unreasonable to expect race control to react quickly to a dangerous situation on the track. Our safety depends on that. Yes I do find it incomprehensible . . .

 

It is unreasonable to stand outside of an official's position in the tower to make calls that affect all racers ontrack in an event as if you have the "golden decision-making ability" and then criticize NASA officials' ability to do our jobs. I have been in race control in the heat of an event and witnessed repeated excellence from our race directors' exceptional ability to utilize every piece of information and coordination to provide a safe place for us to compete . . . This includes an unfortunate number of life-threatening situations, where I have been in the car after horrible shunts, ontrack racing or in the tower. While I share your concern for all racers in any session, until you witness the symphony of proper decison-making that saves a life or protects all racers at that moment, you're talking out your . . . !

 

This thread is a thinly disguised attack by inuendo.

 

Expecting an "out-of control" individual racer to make instananeously correct decisions ontrack usually indicates that the "nut behind the wheel" is out of sync and not the general race group or the officials running the event. No amount of extra meetings or 13/13 rules curb bad decision-making in the heat of battle. Ever gone "too deep" and spun trying to make that pass? Nearly hit that guy while trying to gain advantage on the clag-ridden outside line? Dropped 2 off on a low percentage line trying to race outside your class? Sure, a good talking to in the morning will cure that!

 

I find it personally incomprehensible that people outside the actual racers in a session or line officials ontrack at that moment look for gratification by setting themselves up as experts in a role they have no experience with.

 

I have watched and participated in countless years of racing and NOBODY has a better personal committment to our shared safety at an event than the NASA officiating family.

 

My enduring thanks to the Race Directors, Group Directors, flaggers, officials, and online staff for doing a superb job in very stressful conditions . . . often with little thanks or consideration.

 

Let's not hide behind "I'm in this to help everybody" while pontificating about a process that you don't really understand. Again thanks for the opportunity to comment. Personally, I strongly disagree with both the approach and tenets you present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior
I don't think it's unreasonable to expect race control to react quickly to a dangerous situation on the track. Our safety depends on that. Yes I do find it incomprehensible . . .

 

It is unreasonable to stand outside of an official's position in the tower to make calls that affect all racers ontrack in an event as if you have the "golden decision-making ability" and then criticize NASA officials' ability to do our jobs. I have been in race control in the heat of an event and witnessed repeated excellence from our race directors' exceptional ability to utilize every piece of information and coordination to provide a safe place for us to compete . . . This includes an unfortunate number of life-threatening situations, where I have been in the car after horrible shunts, ontrack racing or in the tower. While I share your concern for all racers in any session, until you witness the symphony of proper decison-making that saves a life or protects all racers at that moment, you're talking out your . . . !

 

This thread is a thinly disguised attack by inuendo.

 

Expecting an "out-of control" individual racer to make instananeously correct decisions ontrack usually indicates that the "nut behind the wheel" is out of sync and not the general race group or the officials running the event. No amount of extra meetings or 13/13 rules curb bad decision-making in the heat of battle. Ever gone "too deep" and spun trying to make that pass? Nearly hit that guy while trying to gain advantage on the clag-ridden outside line? Dropped 2 off on a low percentage line trying to race outside your class? Sure, a good talking to in the morning will cure that!

 

I find it personally incomprehensible that people outside the actual racers in a session or line officials ontrack at that moment look for gratification by setting themselves up as experts in a role they have no experience with.

 

I have watched and participated in countless years of racing and NOBODY has a better personal committment to our shared safety at an event than the NASA officiating family.

 

My enduring thanks to the Race Directors, Group Directors, flaggers, officials, and online staff for doing a superb job in very stressful conditions . . . often with little thanks or consideration.

 

Let's not hide behind "I'm in this to help everybody" while pontificating about a process that you don't really understand. Again thanks for the opportunity to comment. Personally, I strongly disagree with both the approach and tenets you present.

 

 

Really, it's not all about me...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
echtm3
Really, it's not all about me...

 

Ok, back on track so to speak. I think we've veered off course here so to speak....

 

The issue brought up was "Out of control Racers" and that I think has been addressed. We've heard from Sergio and Ryan about the reprimands that have been given out to those drivers, so the issue has been address somewhat.

 

As far as Control's job, I don't think it's fair to bring that up, since we don't have any evidence that there is a problem there.

 

Personally, I have raced in several classes: Honda Challenge, Sentra, CCA and GTS. I've never seen issues until I got to GTS, and I think that is due to the level of cars and drivers and the ratio's that exist within that group (you figure out the math I'm talking about).

 

So, jrgordonsenior, I thank you for bringing this up and getting the attention of the officials that count, so hopefully the next (non-national) GTS event will be much more 'controlled'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pocracr

Great Discussion Great Topic. Having had the experience of course control/race control, flagging, timing and scoring (tear sheets mind you, Cal Club Days), registration, competition director, motorsports director etc..... all of these duties take place behind the scences simultaneously. It is almost impossible for anyone in the paddock to really grasp the organization it takes to make this all happen without a hitch at the same time.

 

After the race in question Rob came over to my trailer to discuss course control and to generally get a feeling for the response of our group and any input I may have had, and apologize for the lengthy yellow. Having been in his shoes on a number of occasions I knew exactly how he felt. While in the tower we cannot control what happens on course ie: blown engine, bone head moves etc... My response to him "did you have any other choice" He stated that while under yellow the staff was trying to get the group more on track time to make up for the yellow. Gents: everyone did their job, end of discussion. IMO Racing is nothing more than controled chaos, first and foremost no one was hurt. Yellow's were out and had it not been for a couple of "bone head" moves, would we really be having this discussion?

 

I have seen alot of stuff happen in my 30 years or so of doing this. While I agree that as drivers we need to tone it down a bit, we are also competitive, otherwise we would be playing jacks. Imposeing penalties, drivers meetings, etc....etc.... all good suggestions. But really, how can we be sure it does not go in one ear and out the other, seen it, been there done that. All anyone can do is give it there best shot. I tell everyone that inquires about NASA the same thing. Come and run, the people, the oraganization, the GTS all are great, 3 things tho. Make sure your safety equipment is correct per the CCR, it will be checked. Read the CCR, and bring your "A" game because we are not messing around. All the flags given that day and at every race I have been involved with here at NASA, are industry standard, no mystery, heck you can figure it out watching TV. I am not and never have been one to hold someones hand and agree with Ryan's comments. So, no extra meetings, as GTS Director I am here to "lend" a hand not hold it, so any advice, help or suggestions are welcome. The checks and balances are in place, the system is and has been working, now it's up to us as drivers to take it to the next level.

 

Sergio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tcmcnett

This has been a great discussion about questionable drivers. I am not perfect and will never claim to be. We all make mistakes it is if we learn from them that matters. Now that is said.

The next questions are what we can do to stop this. If a driver is suspended for 1 or more races all that means is he goes home early from the weekend and looses out on some fun racing. What if we make the driver work (Volunteer) during there suspension. For an on course incident they have to work course or grid for the day. That way they will remember what the mistake cost in time and missed track time. It might also give them a better understanding what the corner workers go through in a race.

 

This is just my thoughts. What would you do to these drivers?

 

TC McNett

FFR #33

So Cal Tech Inspector

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior

This is just my thoughts. What would you do to these drivers?

 

coolhandluke.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
echtm3

This is just my thoughts. What would you do to these drivers?

 

coolhandluke.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ryan0

This is just my thoughts. What would you do to these drivers?

 

57010251_4b4bcbe5d0.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
echtm3

Well I'm glad to see we are all coming together and agreeing on one subject!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ryan F.

I will ask the track to take "cleanup" off the bill and we can provide our own crew!

 

highest-paying-dirty-job-4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neon2dmaX

coolhandluke.jpg

 

That reminds me.... I need to get my car washed before it gets too hot out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgordonsenior

coolhandluke.jpg

 

That reminds me.... I need to get my car washed before it gets too hot out there.

 

Perhaps she could help? Also from 'Cool Hand Luke'...

 

Off to Laguna now with those wild & crazy Porsche racers. Play nice....

 

joyharmon4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
racerrad8

Ryan,

 

Sorry so long in reading this, but I wanted to pass this along.

 

Here is a product that is being used acrossed the country and has been mandated for all INEX sanctioned circle track events.

Raceceiver; http://www.raceceiver.com/p~23.php?c=6"

 

Several years ago when NASA went with the AMB transponder system, people complained but the outcome has been excellent.

 

Maybe the advent of this type of system would assist NASA in the constant battle to provide great racing at the next level of safety.

 

To make sure every racer is turned on and can hear it, grid personnel can call out each individuals car number and they can signal from the cockpit. No answer...No track time.

 

Some more food for thought.

 

Randy Raduechel

NASA Nor-Cal Group C Coordinator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...