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Rear wheel bearings and tools


Scany
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So I probably need to replace my rear wheel bearings. I have yet to take a thourough inspection, but the wheel and rotors can be wiggled and I had some good vibrations in the car at speed.

 

McAvoy has already given advice to get bearing packed with high temp grease from RRT and I will look into that later. It will mostly come down to price.

 

To do this job it seems like it will be a good PITA with a slide hammer and dremel as a tool. Pelican Parts offer a $300 tool promising it will make the job "1000 easier" to remove and install bearings and hub. Does anyone have any experience with this tool from Pelican Parts (http://www.pelicanparts.com/BMW/catalog/shopcart/BE36/POR_BE36_TOLtol_pg2.htm)? I don't mind investing in expensive tools if they really make the job easier. But since Pelican don't have any returns on tools it can be risky without references.

 

Also, any other advice on doing your own bearings?

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I'm all for working on your own car, but here is the kicker. Once your bearings are done properly (grease type) this time, hopefully you will not need to deal with this issue for many track years.

 

So why not spend the time (free) in your garage (I'm jealous) and remove both rear hubs. Take them to your local trusted BMW shop (you know my preference here) along with the new bearings and have them spend the 30-60 minutes to do the dirty work of actual replacement. I know, it sounds a little crazy, but instead of spendnig $300+ on the bearing tool plus shipping, instead you could spend $100 in shop labor time and that's it.

 

I know you have the flexibility to work in the garage with space and plenty of time, so my general point is, use your time to disassemble and reassemble the car. Leave the annoying specialty actions to the experts who have already invested in the super expensive tools and have done it many times before.

 

Just an idea.

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I'm all for working on your own car, but here is the kicker. Once your bearings are done properly (grease type) this time, hopefully you will not need to deal with this issue for many track years.

 

So why not spend the time (free) in your garage (I'm jealous) and remove both rear hubs. Take them to your local trusted BMW shop (you know my preference here) along with the new bearings and have them spend the 30-60 minutes to do the dirty work of actual replacement. I know, it sounds a little crazy, but instead of spendnig $300+ on the bearing tool plus shipping, instead you could spend $100 in shop labor time and that's it.

 

I know you have the flexibility to work in the garage with space and plenty of time, so my general point is, use your time to disassemble and reassemble the car. Leave the annoying specialty actions to the experts who have already invested in the super expensive tools and have done it many times before.

 

Just an idea.

 

It's a good idea Jon. thanks! But to bring the assembly, you will have to bring the trailing arm also I think.

 

I could use this tool for the E30 as well

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The trailing arm isn't difficult to remove. Just take them the whole arm. Most annoying thing will probably be dragging around the ebrake cables etc.

 

I got so annoyed with mine, I just removed the e-brake system, which I kind of regret doing haha.

 

Regardless, I think Jon's approach is better if you can get them off. I've got through bearings on almost all 4 corners now I think, so I'm getting there with replacements haha. I just let my shop do that work though.

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Unfortunately RRT is no longer offering repacked wheel bearings. The bearing design has changed and we can no longer disassemble them without destroying them.

 

Anders, we have quite a few folks who bring us their trailing arms to have the bearing replaced. If you want to go that route we'd be happy to help you.

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Unfortunately RRT is no longer offering repacked wheel bearings. The bearing design has changed and we can no longer disassemble them without destroying them.

 

Anders, we have quite a few folks who bring us their trailing arms to have the bearing replaced. If you want to go that route we'd be happy to help you.

 

 

So Bruce is this to say that you can no longer change the grease? So basically we will be forced to run on whatever the OEM supplier uses to pack the bearings?

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Unfortunately RRT is no longer offering repacked wheel bearings. The bearing design has changed and we can no longer disassemble them without destroying them.

 

Anders, we have quite a few folks who bring us their trailing arms to have the bearing replaced. If you want to go that route we'd be happy to help you.

 

 

So Bruce is this to say that you can no longer change the grease? So basically we will be forced to run on whatever the OEM supplier uses to pack the bearings?

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Unfortunately RRT is no longer offering repacked wheel bearings. The bearing design has changed and we can no longer disassemble them without destroying them.

 

Anders, we have quite a few folks who bring us their trailing arms to have the bearing replaced. If you want to go that route we'd be happy to help you.

 

Thanks! I might just do that.

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Unfortunately RRT is no longer offering repacked wheel bearings. The bearing design has changed and we can no longer disassemble them without destroying them.

 

So Bruce is this to say that you can no longer change the grease? So basically we will be forced to run on whatever the OEM supplier uses to pack the bearings?

 

Unfortunately that is correct Jon.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have decided to get the B90 tool and give it a go. I don't like not to be able to do it myself, as the racecar is sort of my learning book on cars. But I can smell that this will come back and bite me in the arse Worst case I'll take it off and swing by RRT or someone.

 

I'm going to order the tools from ZDmak.com which I have used for other tools in the past, and their stuff is great, with a fair return policy (unlike Pelican on tools ).

 

Wish me luck, because I think I need it

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  • 2 weeks later...

Last night I went out to the garage to test that my 31mm 12pt socket was the right one. Then I discover that the nut on the wheel in trouble is loose!! I tighten it and the wheel is no longer woobly. Obviously the tabs on the nuts have worked themselves loose, or a fool has bent them back.

 

So, my bearing problem now nolonger seems like a bearing problem, but an axle nut problem. I haven't had any noise from the bearings. What do you guys think about this: change the nuts and leave the bearings to be replaced during the off season? I'm very tempted to do this and not make troubles for myself, just a couple of weeks before VIR. I can always bring the tools and bearings to VIR in case.

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Last night I went out to the garage to test that my 31mm 12pt socket was the right one. Then I discover that the nut on the wheel in trouble is loose!! I tighten it and the wheel is no longer woobly. Obviously the tabs on the nuts have worked themselves loose, or a fool has bent them back.

 

So, my bearing problem now nolonger seems like a bearing problem, but an axle nut problem. I haven't had any noise from the bearings. What do you guys think about this: change the nuts and leave the bearings to be replaced during the off season? I'm very tempted to do this and not make troubles for myself, just a couple of weeks before VIR. I can always bring the tools and bearings to VIR in case.

 

I'm about two steps behind you on this one. Just purchased new front hub assembly due to vibration. Now I'm going right home to check my nuts (wait, what? ).

 

I guess the question to your question would be what are the chances that your loose nut/vibration actually damaged the bearing?

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I'm about two steps behind you on this one. Just purchased new front hub assembly due to vibration. Now I'm going right home to check my nuts (wait, what? ).

 

I guess the question to your question would be what are the chances that your loose nut/vibration actually damaged the bearing?

 

Yeah, I don't know. The nut was probably about 360 degrees loose. The wheel could move in and out on the top about a 1/4 inch maybe. I guess I'll tighten the nuts and take it for a ride around the neighborhood (among the dirtbikes and 4wheelers). If I don't hear or feel anything I feel like a new nut would do the trick. Maybe I'll order two new ones in case I need a bearing job at the track.

 

Another thing is this: why were the tabs loose? Maybe the previous owners mechanic changed the barings but didn't get the tabs done, or put new nuts on there? I did see some tendencies towards a mechanic of these qualities while taking out the engine

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I think the real question is whether or not the wobble has prematurely worn the bearing.

 

If you bring the tools with you and the job is "doable" at the track, I say run'em till they fail. If they fail during the weekend, just be ready (meaning research the heck out of the process ahead of time) to do the replacement.

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