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Dry break, and other Pit Stop questions


Tansar_Motorsports
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Hi,

1.  For refueling, are "Dry Break" systems allowed, as long as I am still using 5 gallon Jugs?

2.  For fuel jugs not specifically shown in the appendix, can I submit these to be inspected and approved by my local NASA staff, or do I have to submit them here for national approval and inclusion in the appendix?  

3.  The rules state that only 1 refueling location is allowed.  My car has 2.  The stock fuel cap, and the dry break.  Am I allowed to compete, as long as I only use 1 of these (the other could be taped over, etc)?

4.  I don't see any mention of minimum number of pitstops, or maximum time between pitstops.  Is there a rule?  If not, NASA may want to add one (pretty much every cheap endurance race organization has these rules).  Without these rules, cars with max size tanks, and/or cars that get better MPG will have an advantage.  The 10 gallons max per pitstop tries to address this I think, but it's not enough.  A miata can go a lot longer on 10 gallons than a mustang.  A good rule would be:   "minimum number of pitstops during the race = (race time in minutes / 45) - 1"     This would work out to approx 45 minutes between stops, or, more likely, a long first stint (starting full of fuel), and then 30-45 minute stints after that.

Thanks

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

My original questions and concerns still stand.

I would very much like to participate in TREC with my former IMSA Koni Challenge RX-8.

 

Since it was a semi-pro built car, it uses dry-break refueling, which, by the current rules, prevents me from being able to participate.

Many WRL/AER cars also use dry-break, and are currently being left out by the NASA rules.

 

If we have minimum pit-stop times, and 10 gallon maximum refueling, then I really cant understand why dry-break would make a difference.  There really isn't a competitive advantage to being able to refuel in 20s instead of 1 minute.
From a safety perspective, dry-break systems spill significantly less fuel than traditional jugs, and if doing a 10 gallon fill-up, completely emptying 2 dry break jugs, a dry break would spill zero gas. 

Hopefully the 2022 rules can make consideration for cars like mine, and I can start participating.

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