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2022 ST Rules Release Today!


Greg G.
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Hi Folks,

The 2022 Rules for ST 1-4 & SU, ST5-6, and TT all are due to be posted by 9am Mountain Time today.

There are some significant changes that have been made that have been in the works since March 2021 in regard to tires.  Due to issues beyond our control, we were not able to really discuss these changes, and some of them were not confirmed until a few days ago.   These changes were brought about by requests from our competitors over the past years (in some cases, many years), and by far have been the most requested changes on a regular basis.  We have had hundreds of requests for tire balance of performance changes, and we have come up with the start of what will become an ongoing process of assessment and reassessment of tire performance and capability.  We will use available data that we find reliable as well as our own testing to make determinations and future reassignments.   We will not use treadwear rating as the determining factor in tire performance on track, just as we don’t use tire size printed on DOT tires to determine size on a wheel.  In fact, we never have used treadwear rating for this purpose.  We only used it out of convenience because all of the tires that we wanted to fall under our Mod Factor happened to fit that definition.   We clearly cannot use that definition any longer with all of the outliers.  Our goal is to improve our tire performance balance, while at the same time, allow our drivers to be competitive on a cheaper tire budget if possible, and to also take advantage of the various tire contingencies that are offered to NASA competitors, while at the same time, provide some incentive for other tire manufacturers to jump in and offer up their own NASA contingency programs, and lastly, allow the large contingent of drivers who are satisfied with their current tire choice to continue to be competitive on those tires.   As usual, we are starting with a bit of a conservative approach in regard to some of the individual tire model decisions made.   Since we are looking at more than just initial grip level of a tire, some will undoubtedly comment that this XYZ tire is faster than that ABC tire, so why isn’t it in the same group?   The answer is that it might be in the future, but with our competitions ranging from a one-lap TT flier to a 6 hour enduro, and tire sizes from 195 to 345, with vehicles that weigh less than 1500 lbs to more than 4000 lbs, we would rather start out more conservative than having to “take away” a positive Mod Factor in the future.   One additional note about tires is that some drivers chose to approve tires themselves for the 100 TW category without seeking official approval for new tires entering the market as the 2018-2021 rules clearly stated.   These tires proved to be outliers and would not have been approved in that group, and are now appropriately classified.

For the first time in Super Touring, a tire has been specified for a class for the 2022 NASA Championships.  This could be the start of a trend for especially the lower ST classes.  The class is: ST4 (does not apply to TT4).  The tire is……..6 hours to go.  

Actually, just about all of the changes we make to rules are brought about by requests from either our competitors or our officials.   We have added a line item for manually activated mechanical throttle body (no electronic servo’s, etc.).  Again, the Mod Factor is very conservative, and can always be adjusted in the future.  It acknowledges that there are inherent advantages of having an electronic throttle body control beyond ease of tuning.   As well, torque converter automatic transmissions are no longer from your grandma’s old station wagon.  The technological advances have been rapid, and the performance gains fairly huge, and we have added them back to the Mod Factor list (they were removed about 15 or so years ago).   We have increased the amount of permitted added ballast to 300 lbs. to help competitors who are attempting to drop classes with newly found Mod Factors.  We have once again attempted to make it crystal clear that power levels cannot be changed, with some new wording, and a new potential stiff penalty if found to be out of compliance.  Make sure that you give us Dyno print outs from all power settings that your car has!   We had some requests for the H shifter to sequential converter kits, and will permit them in ST1-4 with a small Mod Factor.  And, we have revised some additional language that was giving some competitors some difficulty in correctly interpreting.   

The details of the last new development are not actually coming out today, but will hopefully be out in early 2022.  They pertain to data collection at the 2022 NASA Championships, with the expectation that a similar program will start regionally in 2023. 

As usual, if you have questions for us, please contact us directly through e-mail, NASA Community support requests, or a post on the NASA Community Forums.  We don’t want your question to get buried in a FB thread where we may miss it.  

See you at the track!!

Edited by Greg G.
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3 hours ago, Brian Clarke said:

Will all these changes be approapriately marked in the document so we can see them easily?

Always!

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44 minutes ago, Tykrane30 said:

So, what does this mean for the Goodyear Supercar 3R? are we not allowed to run that tire?

Or does it fall under the same class as a Hoosier?

It appears you get nothing for it.  So it's as if your running a hoosier and the only mod factor would be 282mm or smaller.

 

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2 hours ago, Brian Clarke said:

It appears you get nothing for it.  So it's as if your running a hoosier and the only mod factor would be 282mm or smaller.

 

I was reading the same thing. But having run both tires, its quick but definitely not the same league as a Hoosier.

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1 hour ago, EB Turbo said:

Why would having a cable/mechanical throttle body be a disadvantage and require a point mod? 

Tuning ability, auto rev matching and WOT shifts, better traction and stability control that can actually be used on track, better performance with decreased lag. 

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1 hour ago, EB Turbo said:

Why would having a cable/mechanical throttle body be a disadvantage and require a point mod? 

You actually get points back for having a mechanical TB

"Power: Manually, mechanically actuated throttle body (no electronic servo) = +0.2"

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7 hours ago, Tykrane30 said:

I was reading the same thing. But having run both tires, its quick but definitely not the same league as a Hoosier.

Perhaps you didn’t find that, but many have found them to be faster than R7’s and approaching A7’s—so probably setup, size, track, power levels, etc. 

Yes, no Mod Factor, but can be used in ST1/TT1-ST6/TT6 unless there is a Spec tire, like ST4 had at the 2022 Champs.

 

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The Nankang CR-1 is in the 100 TW tire group, but it’s a 200 TW tire, and the AR-1 is listed in the 200TW group but it’s a 100TW tire. Can someone verify that this is correct?

and where would the Nankang NS-2R 200tw tire fall? 
 

thank you. 

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19 minutes ago, SC17 said:

The Nankang CR-1 is in the 100 TW tire group, but it’s a 200 TW tire, and the AR-1 is listed in the 200TW group but it’s a 100TW tire. Can someone verify that this is correct?

and where would the Nankang NS-2R 200tw tire fall? 
 

thank you. 

Thanks, will check that—may have been a typo. 

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55 minutes ago, SC17 said:

The Nankang CR-1 is in the 100 TW tire group, but it’s a 200 TW tire, and the AR-1 is listed in the 200TW group but it’s a 100TW tire. Can someone verify that this is correct?

and where would the Nankang NS-2R 200tw tire fall? 
 

thank you. 

While I know we are not necessarily going by TW ratings per manufacturer, the same question would apply to other 100 TW and 40 TW tires appearing in the 1.6 section such as the Toyo RR and Maxxis VR-1.  Comparing those tires to say the Hankook Ventus RS4 appearing in the 1.0 section doesn't add up performance wise, but perhaps I am missing something?  Greg - this is why I asked the question in the other thread on clarifying the list of tires per section (1.6 and 1.0) 

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3 hours ago, NorcalTT said:

While I know we are not necessarily going by TW ratings per manufacturer, the same question would apply to other 100 TW and 40 TW tires appearing in the 1.6 section such as the Toyo RR and Maxxis VR-1.  Comparing those tires to say the Hankook Ventus RS4 appearing in the 1.0 section doesn't add up performance wise, but perhaps I am missing something?  Greg - this is why I asked the question in the other thread on clarifying the list of tires per section (1.6 and 1.0) 

So, the listings are correct.  His statement about 100 and 200 was confusing--would be better to use the nomenclature +1.6 Mod Factor group and +1.0 Mod Factor group in discussion.  We need to stop taking about treadwear that means nothing other than a tire is able to compete under rules that require 200+ TW.  Yes, we know that we have given some tires with lower TW ratings a better Mod Factor.  And, we know that some of the tires listed in the +1.0 group will likely move to the +1.6 group. 

The Nankang NS-2R will be put into the +1.6 group. 
The Hankook RS4 has some crazy data out there, including from Tire Rack.  So, even though we think it probably belongs  in the +1.6 group, we are going conservative on that one.  For some of the others in the +1.0 group, we just don't have enough data to move them to the +1.6 group.  We need to be careful, because we have such a diverse group of vehicles, classes, and even TT vs Sprint Race vs Enduro (as the enduro classing is based on ST for the most part). 

This is going to be an ongoing process, and the listings will change over time.  These manufacturers can substitute a new compound without ever saying anything publicly, and suddenly the tires are faster or slower without reason.  So, we will have to watch this much more closely now.  I think that I will likely put together a NASA ST/TT Tire Advisory Committee, made up of select NASA TT Directors, ST Leaders, and other officials, whose job it will be to compile data and monitor the market, research new tires coming out, and present the data to our National team.   However, not all decisions will strictly be made based on best lap time.  As you can see, there are certain tires that are somewhat favored as we believe they will give our drivers the best overall outcomes (lap times, race performance, longevity, tire budget, current and potential future contingency programs, tire size availability). 

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The Tire Advisory Committee is a good idea. Some of the tires in the same “bucket” are quite different in terms of performance. Nitto vs Toyo RR for example.

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Hi Greg,

I am curious on why st4 is requiring a Hoosier spec tire for the finals at Laguna Seca. I understand there may be more behind it, like sponships and stuff but purely from a rule sense it seems to have more negitives than pluses. I believe tire strategy can play a big deal in ST4, so why take that strategy away at the finals.

 

Here is a possible real case scenario for me and many others that may give a better example of what I am refering to.

 

 

Here is a possible setup for my car that I could run all year and than have to change just for the Championship weekend.

3550 minium weight

344 whp

+ 1.6  275mm toyo RRs

.-5 for paddle shifting transmission

 

Than for the finals I have to swicth to:

3550 minium weight

275 whp

-1 hoosier A7's

.-5 transmission

 

or

 

3550 minium weight

298 whp

Hoosier R7's

.-5 transmission

That could be a 46- 69 whp difference. That is no small change, cost wise or time wise (setup, dyno, ect)

It seems like it would take a completely different setup for the finals, this requires a lot of set up changes and a new dyno for one of most important weekends of the season.  People work all year to get the best setup to take advantage of the advantages of there cars, why force everyone into the same box. I believe what makes ST a fun series to race in, is the diversitiy of cars, and seeing whos strategy worked the best.

 

The other downside to the spec tires at the finals, is it makes it a lot more expensive. It would suck if you have been running toyo's and winning toyo bucks, but can't use them, because you have to switch to hoosiers. It also adds additional costs to the racers who are also planning on racing in the endurance race on monday, because most likely they won't want to use hoosiers for a 6 hour race, meaning you got to bring even more sets of tires.

The guys who run hoosiers all season will have the advantage again at the finals, becuase they can keep there season long tuned current setup, and might already have earned contigency money, making it easier to have more sets of fresh hoosiers that championship weekend.

 

Just some of my thoughts, cause I would really like to go to Laguna Seca, but this makes it more of a challenge. It also seems a bit strange to only do spec tires for ST4.

 

Thanks,

Tom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Tom,

They would have been Spec'd for the entire year, but for a variety of reasons that you can probably guess about, it took too long, and we wanted drivers to have enough time to make the switch if it is a switch for them.  The tire surveys that we got back, as well as the ST/TT Car Classification Forms show that ST4 is for the most part already a Hoosier class and the majority of drivers want to stay on them.  Of course, the change from +0.6 to +1.6 makes a difference in a driver's calculation of whether to choose a Toyo versus Hoosier at regional events, but we think that the number is just about right in terms of the ability to still win.  So, if you can still win on the Hoosier, and you will need Hoosiers at the Champs, most will just stay on the Hoosier or move to it during the regional events.  Especially knowing that it is unlikely that we would Spec a tire for only a single event, and not in the future if the stars all line up correctly.

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4 hours ago, Greg G. said:

Hi Tom,

They would have been Spec'd for the entire year, but for a variety of reasons that you can probably guess about, it took too long, and we wanted drivers to have enough time to make the switch if it is a switch for them.  The tire surveys that we got back, as well as the ST/TT Car Classification Forms show that ST4 is for the most part already a Hoosier class and the majority of drivers want to stay on them.  Of course, the change from +0.6 to +1.6 makes a difference in a driver's calculation of whether to choose a Toyo versus Hoosier at regional events, but we think that the number is just about right in terms of the ability to still win.  So, if you can still win on the Hoosier, and you will need Hoosiers at the Champs, most will just stay on the Hoosier or move to it during the regional events.  Especially knowing that it is unlikely that we would Spec a tire for only a single event, and not in the future if the stars all line up correctly.

Would it be Right to assume, that If nationals goes well -- everyone is super competitive and happy on the A/R7s -- we should expect a Series Spec tire of the A/R7 for 2023? At least for ST4 -- Or is the test to see if Regionally we start to see more diverse tires due to the +.6 +1.6  which would want us to mix in more tires for this class? 

Edited by ChuggLifeRacing
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As someone hoping to enter the series this year, it seems that the mod factor changes for tires help out those of us that don't want to run sticker Hoosiers every weekend. The thought that next year could bring a Hoosier spec tire to the series is concerning. I realize that most frontrunners may already be running Hoosiers, but that seems an easy way to explode my tire budget.

 

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14 hours ago, Greg G. said:

Tuning ability, auto rev matching and WOT shifts, better traction and stability control that can actually be used on track, better performance with decreased lag. 

This would be assuming if I have DBW that I am taking advantage of, auto blip, flat shifting, and DBW based TCS. On an H-pattern manual transmission car, unless fitted by the OEM, most to all do not have auto blip. Auto blip should be factored in to the points mod of a sequential or paddle shifted automatic transmission. There are methods of auto blipping with mechanically/cable actuated throttles. Plus I can still WOT flat shift with a mechanically/cable actuated throttle.

 If my car does not have traction control, I do not have any advantage from the DBW in regards to Traction/Stability control. I can still have traction control and a mechanically/cable actuated throttle. giving an advantage to a competitor with TCS and mechanically/cable actuated throttle over someone with no TCS and a DBW, is opposite of what you are trying to do with this mod factor. 

 Performance and Lag are quite subjective. There are alternate throttle cams available to alter the relationship between pedal and throttle movement. these can be replaced within the same to less time than someone making an ECU change. With a direct link between the throttle and pedal, the mechanically/cable actuated throttle has zero lag. Saying that the ease of adjustability is a determining factor in points modification, opens the door for many other "ease of adjustability claims" to be brought. If those claims are negated then the DBW adjustability claim should not be used. example, If my car takes 45min to make an alignment adjustment and a competitors vehicle only takes 5min to make a like change, Why should I not be given an advantage for my car being harder or more time consuming to have adjustments made?  

      

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7 hours ago, Greg G. said:

Hi Tom,

They would have been Spec'd for the entire year, but for a variety of reasons that you can probably guess about, it took too long, and we wanted drivers to have enough time to make the switch if it is a switch for them.  The tire surveys that we got back, as well as the ST/TT Car Classification Forms show that ST4 is for the most part already a Hoosier class and the majority of drivers want to stay on them.  Of course, the change from +0.6 to +1.6 makes a difference in a driver's calculation of whether to choose a Toyo versus Hoosier at regional events, but we think that the number is just about right in terms of the ability to still win.  So, if you can still win on the Hoosier, and you will need Hoosiers at the Champs, most will just stay on the Hoosier or move to it during the regional events.  Especially knowing that it is unlikely that we would Spec a tire for only a single event, and not in the future if the stars all line up correctly.

 I think what is missed here is if everyone is required to run a "spec" tire. any points modifications are just a direct modification to the base class. If ST-4 is a base of 12.0:1 and everyone is forced to run the Hoosier tire, everyone automatically has to take a -1.0. This starts everyone off at a 13.0:1. If everyone is forced to run a spec tire, why would there need to be such a heavy points modification to the entire class? Either change the ST-4 to a base of 13.0:1 and no points modification, or leave it at 12.0:1 and take away any points mod because everyone will be on the same tire anyway. 

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@Greg G.just out of curiosity, why would ST4 be the class going to Spec Hoosier? I would think ST1-3 would be where you find the vast majority of racers who would be fine with Spec Hoosier. These are some of the most expensive cars on grid. ST4 is a "lower cost/more restrictive" class where I'd think keeping the Hoosier vs street tire option open has the most support. A bulk of the cars from other orgs such as gridlife/AER you are trying to attract would be looking to slot into ST4 with their street tires. Then a no Hoosier in ST5/6. I would think these large mods are likely to cause the most "drama" in ST1-3 since you now effectively have ST2 cars on street tires running in ST3. This is a pretty massive straight line speed differential at larger tracks such as VIR/Watkins even if the cars are effectively running the same laptime.

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7 hours ago, ChuggLifeRacing said:

Would it be Right to assume, that If nationals goes well -- everyone is super competitive and happy on the A/R7s -- we should expect a Series Spec tire of the A/R7 for 2023? At least for ST4 -- Or is the test to see if Regionally we start to see more diverse tires due to the +.6 +1.6  which would want us to mix in more tires for this class? 

Adam, I think you have it correct on your first statement.  But, if something unexpected happens, and suddenly 90% of TT4 and regional ST4 drivers are on diverse tires, we would have to take a serious look at that plan.  As well, there are sponsorship issues when a tire gets Spec'd that can always throw a wrench in any plans that sound good.

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3 hours ago, daytonars4 said:

@Greg G.just out of curiosity, why would ST4 be the class going to Spec Hoosier? I would think ST1-3 would be where you find the vast majority of racers who would be fine with Spec Hoosier. These are some of the most expensive cars on grid. ST4 is a "lower cost/more restrictive" class where I'd think keeping the Hoosier vs street tire option open has the most support. A bulk of the cars from other orgs such as gridlife/AER you are trying to attract would be looking to slot into ST4 with their street tires. Then a no Hoosier in ST5/6. I would think these large mods are likely to cause the most "drama" in ST1-3 since you now effectively have ST2 cars on street tires running in ST3. This is a pretty massive straight line speed differential at larger tracks such as VIR/Watkins even if the cars are effectively running the same laptime.

You definitely have some valid points.  And, you are also correct that our more higher cost classes often have the most "drama" and the most resistance to anything that is "required".  I can hear it now from the guys who run non-DOT tires---"Don't even think about it, NASA!!!". 🤣    ST4 was in large part a Hoosier class already, and as you see, we didn't Spec the R7 versus A7, and just let the Mod Factor do the work on that.  We didn't Spec TT4, so we will be able to see what the "natural" result of the rule changes are at the ST4/TT4 level.   We already saw what you are talking about in regard to straight line speed at Daytona, where tire choices were not the same as the drivers' usual regional setup, but that is just part of the game.  No tire rules are going to be ideal for all tracks, all cars, all drivers.  FYI, ST6 was a blink away from becoming a Spec class also, but with a different tire.   ST5 will surely be getting an eyeball this year also.

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